Quantcast
Sign up & receive $25 off your first order

2018 POCW Heathcote Syrah No 2

2018 POCW Heathcote Syrah No 2

$26.99 Per Bottle

|

$25.99 (Buy 6 or More)

Heathcote
2018
750ml
+
BOTTLE(S)
In Stock, ready for dispatch.More info
$26.99
Heathcote
2018
750ml
  • THE BRIEF
  • THE FINER DETAILS
  • WHO MADE IT?
  • EXPERT REVIEWS
  • THE BRIEF
  • And with this release the transition from Graillot Project to Place of Changing Winds is complete.

    This is a step towards releases that are entirely reflective of the single site. It's a wine that reflects a continued desire to produce wines of great finesse from a region historically known for powerhouse reds.

  • THE FINER DETAILS
  • The Syrah No. 2 comes mostly from short- and medium-length macerations (one to two weeks) and is made with 100% whole cluster, natural yeast fermentations and no sulphur additions until well after malolactic. Bottling occurred after 12 months aging in neutral oak and in a range of different formats: 1000lt, 2000lt, barriques, 500lt and 600lt.

    WHAT SHOULD YOU EXPECT?


    A spicy, medium-bodied Syrah, closer in weight to many Northern Rhône wines than what we typically expect from Heathcote. It offers loads of spice, energy and drive, and the complex aromas and flavours of dark plum, olive, bay leaf and tobacco.

  • WHO MADE IT?
  • Place of Changing Winds is the vineyard project of Bibendum’s founder and owner Robert Walters. It is a single site in the Macedon Ranges of Victoria where Walters and his team began planting in 2012. Prior to this, Walters had searched for almost five years to find the right location until Michael Dhillon of Bindi called him one day to say, “I’ve found your property!” It turned out Dhillon was right. The POCW site is very close to Bindi and lies on the same geological belt and yet there are very clear differences. When it comes to geology and climate, things change very quickly. Regardless, this is certainly an area with a proven track record for quality Pinot and Chardonnay. This made the choice of varieties pretty simple. To be precise, the vineyard is in a little hamlet called Bullengarook, between Mount Bullengarook and Mount Macedon, in the hills above Gisborne, about one-hour north-west of Melbourne. The soils: The soil here is eroded quartz, sandstone and quartzite over clay and is over 400 million years old. It was formed at the bottom of the ocean in the Ordovician Period. Of course, soil is very complex and we always simplify when we speak of geology. In simple terms, it is a very rocky, gravelly soil and historically this soil type was called “Bullengarook gravel”. The elevation is a high 500+ metres and the average rainfall is typically between 700 and 900 mm. It’s a genuinely cool site with very cold nights and massive diurnal range (variation between max day and night temperatures) which Pinot and Chardonnay love. In summer, the diurnal range can often exceed 20°C (sometimes even 25°C!) and this leads to heavy morning dews and also strong frosts. The practice: ‘No compromise, no regrets’ is the motto here with Rob drawing on his years of experience observing many of the great growers of Europe and translating what he considered to be ‘best practice’ to his particular setting. The idea of the vineyard and, more long-term, the running of the farm, is to create a self-contained environment, run organically and, eventually, along permaculture lines – practices that maximise the chance for quality, soil and vine health and for maximum expression of place. The vines have been planted to a very high density of between 12,000 and 33,000 vines per hectare (plus some even closer experimental plantings). By way of comparison, densities in Australia are typically between 2,000 and 3,000 vines per hectare. The logic behind these high-density plantings are various and complex but in basic terms they force the vine roots down, making the vines pump from the sub-soil. Such densities also force the vines to work together in complex ways and it ideally creates a vine with a more balanced canopy, fewer, smaller bunches and far less yield per plant. If all goes well, we will get 400-500 gm of fruit per plant – the norm in quality Australian vineyards is closer to 2-3 kg per plant (or higher). This is not to say what is being done here represents a ‘better’ way - it is way too early to make any such claims. But it is certainly a very different approach and much more labour-intensive, much more complex and vastly more costly. To understand how to establish and manage this kind of vineyard took a lot of research and has been the result of some 25 years of engagement with the best European growers. By the time the project was established, Rob, with his viticulturist and friend Tim Brown had visited Europe together five times, in order to meet with many of the most inspirational growers Rob know, and finalsing the planning of the vineyard. Today, this foundational work is having benefits beyond Changing Winds with a number of other producers in Victoria, also having utilised Tim Brown to plant close-planted vineyards of their own, while others are now exploring the option. All of the vineyard practices are designed to maximise life in the soil, which in turn, ensures a strong connection between the plant and its environment. They are also designed to maximise the health of the vine and to drive the vine roots down, where they can explore the sub-soil (for water and minerals). The method of pruning is often called ‘Poussard’ and started to be applied in 2013. It’s a type of pruning that respects the natural biology of the plant and creates more robustness and disease resistance. In order to have a broad variety of expression, the vineyard is planted to nine clones, on both own roots and a variety of rootstocks. Aside from Walters, other key members of the vineyard team include Tin Brown, Rémi Jacquemain and Tom Myers. Each has played a vital role in helping us get to where we are today. The name: Our vineyard lies in an area that was called Warekilla by the original inhabitants, the Wurundjeri people. In their language, Warekilla meant Place of Changing Winds (a characteristic of the site that still holds true today).

  • EXPERT REVIEWS
  • 90 POINTS

    HUON HOOKE - THE REAL REVIEW


    Deepish red/purple colour. Intense whole-bunchy ferment aromas, stemmy and slightly green, but undeniably fragrant. Pepper-spice. The wine is light to medium-weight and leanish, quite elegant and understated. It's a very bunchy style that just needs a bit of time to come together and soften a little. It has the makings of a charmer.