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Rosé Wines

Rosé has come a long way in the last decade. Ten years ago most producers around the world, except in the South of France, treated rosé as a side proj...

Rosé has come a long way in the last decade. Ten years ago most producers around the world, except in the South of France, treated rosé as a side project without the attention to detail shown in the production of sparkling, reds and white wines. For many, it was just a by-product of red winemaking. Lightly coloured juice was simply run off to give greater concentration to the resulting red wines which was bottled as - you guessed it - rosé.

But then something happened - rosé took off around the world. From British supermarkets to pubs in New Zealand, rosé was suddenly fashionable. And with that rosé was no longer an afterthought - it was now as important as white, red and sparkling wines.

The change was the greatest in Australia where winemakers ditched the red-cordial coloured, fat, sweetened rosé in favour of savoury and elegant wines. No longer were these just a by-product for red winemaking. Grapes were grown, picked and made specifically to be rosé. These new styles often show an almost salmon orange pink colour which is matched by subtle and savoury red fruit characters.

One of rosé’s greatest attributes is that good wines can be produced almost everywhere, as is seen in France. From the coolest wine regions in Champagne and the Loire Valley to the hot climates on the Mediterranean, where many of the best wines are made, it is quite possible to make serious wines with a little effort. And also these can be made from most red grape varieties including classics such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Pinot Noir through to Grenache, Carignan, Cinsault and Cabernet Franc.

In Australia the same is true - great rosé comes from all over the country. From Barossan Grenache based rosés to perfumed and elegant rosés made from Yarra Valley Pinot Noir, there is great rosé to be had almost in every premium wine region.

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